Undergraduate

Undergraduate Curriculum

I. Semester    
     
PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 103 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (4-0)4
PHIL 145 History of Ancient Philosophy I (3-0)3
ENG 101 Development of Reading and Writing Skills I (4-0)4
TURK 101 Turkish I NC
  Departmental Elective  
     
II. Semester    
     
PHIL 108 Introduction to Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 146 History of Ancient Philosophy II (3-0)3
ENG 102 Development of Reading and Writing Skills II (4-0)4
TURK 102 Turkish NC
IS 100 Introduction to Information Technologies and Applications NC
  Departmental Elective  
  Departmental Elective  
     
III. Semester    
     
PHIL 201 Ethics I (4-0)4
PHIL 203 Modern Logics I (4-0)4
ENG 211 Advanced Reading and Oral Communication (3-0)3
HIST 2201 Principles of Kemal Atatürk I NC
  Departmental Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
IV.Semester    
     
PHIL 248 Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (4-0)4
PHIL 282 History of Science (4-0)4
HIST 2202 Principles of Kemal Atatürk NC
  Departmental Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
V. Semester    
     
PHIL 341 History of 17th and 18th Centuries Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 381 Scientific Method I (3-0)3
  Free Elective  
  Free Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
VI. Semester    
     
PHIL 342 History of 17th and 18th Centuries Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 382 Scientific Method II (3-0)3
  Free Elective (3-0)3
  Free Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
VII. Semester    
     
PHIL 405 Philosophy of Language (4-0)4
PHIL 441 Contemporary Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 491 Computer Use in Philosophy (3-0)3
  Departmental Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
VIII. Semester    
     
PHIL 442 Contemporary Philosophy II (4-0)4
  Departmental Elective  
  Departmental Elective  
  Departmental Elective  
  Free Elective  

 

Undergraduate Course Description

Description of Undergraduate Courses in Systematic Philosophy and Logic

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy I:

An introductory survey of the main problems of philosophy.

PHIL 103 Introduction to Symbolic Logic:

Sentential and quantificational logic. Symbolization and tableau method of proof. Modalities.

PHIL 104 Traditional Logic:

A survey of basic concepts in Aristotelian, Stoic and Medieval Islamic Logic.

PHIL 106 Theory of Knowledge I:

Logico-philosophical analysis of knowledge and belief.

PHIL 108 Introduction Philosophy II:

Continuation of PHIL 101.

PHIL 201 Ethics I:

Problems of moral conduct. Theories of ethics.

PHIL 202 Aesthetics:

Study of the nature of beauty, art and creativity, artistic appreciation and criticism.

PHIL 203 Modern Logic I:

First-order logic with identity and modal logic.

PHIL 204 Theory of Knowledge II:

Common-sense knowledge and scientific knowledge. The growth of knowledge; rationality and progress.

PHIL 205 Basic Philosophy of Science:

Scientific concepts, measurement, prediction, explanation, laws, theories.

PHIL 206 Philosophy of Natural Science:

Inroduction to the philosophical problems of natural science.

PHIL 301 Modern Logic II:

Application of logic to axiomatic set theory.

PHIL 302 Systematic Philosophy:

Metaphilosophical analysis of philosophical problems and solutions. The methods of logical analysis and logical reconstruction.

PHIL 304 Ethics II:

Study of ethical and metaethical theories.

PHIL 401 Modern Logic II:

Philosophical logic: Modal, epistemic, and deontic logics.

PHIL 402 Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics:

The nature of logic and mathematics. Necessary truths and existence in logic and mathematics. Logicism, intuitionism, and formalism.

PHIL 404 Philosophy of State and Society:

Problems in the philosophy of social science and in political philosophy.

PHIL 405 Philosophy of Language:

Oridinary language and formal languages. Syntax, semantics, pragmatics. Extention and intension. Naming and predication. Theory of reference and theory of meaning.

PHIL 407 Philosophy of Mind I:

Study of the mind-body problem and the problem of free will and determinism. Survey of the main theories of mind and human action.

PHIL 408 Philosophy of Mind II:

Continuation of PHIL 407.

Description of Undergraduate Courses in History of Philosophy

PHIL 145 History of Ancient Philosphy I:

Survey of the Western Philosophy from Thales to the Sophists.

PHIL 146 History of Ancient Philosophy II:

Study of Western Philosophy from Socrates to Neoplatonism.

PHIL 241 Philosophical Texts I:

Study of major texts in philosophy.

PHIL 242 Philosophical Texts II:

Study of major texts in philosphy.

PHIL 245 Mediveal Philosphy:

An introductory survey of major problems in mediveal philosophy.

PHIL 248 Mediveal and Renaissance Philosophy:

Survey of post-Aristotelian and mediveal philosphies. Philosophy in the Renaissance; Humanism; controversy between the Platonists and the Aristotelians; scepticism, and Reformation.

PHIL 341 History of 17th and 18th Century Philosophy I:

A study of Continental Philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries with special emphasis on Rationalism, Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz.

PHIL 342 History of 17th and 18th Philosophy II:

Anglo-Saxon philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries. Locke, Berkeley and Hume.

PHIL 345 Philosophical Texts III:

Study of major texts in philosophy.

PHIL 346 Philosophical Texts IV:

Study of major texts in philosophy.

PHIL 441 Contemporary Philosophy I:

The Kantian influence. Positivism, naturalism, pragmatism, neo-positivism.

PHIL 442 Contemporary II:

Phenomenological analysis and existential perspective. Analytic philosophy. Hermeneutic philosophy.

PHIL 443 Islamic Philosophers:

Text-oriented study of some major Islamic philosophers.

PHIL 444 The 19th Century Philosophy:

A survey of Anglo-Saxon and Continental Philosophies of the 19th Century.

Description of Undergraduate Courses in History of Science

PHIL 182 Introduction to History of Science:

Historical study in the development of science.

PHIL 282 History of Science:

Problems of the development of science through history.

PHIL 381 Scientific Method I:

Observation and experimentation. Induction, deduction and the hypothetico-deductive method. Scientific hypotheses, laws and theories.

PHIL 382 Scientific Method II:

Continuation of PHIL 381.

PHIL 383 History of Science II:

Development of science in Middle Ages.

PHIL 481 History of Science III:

Development of science the in 18th, and 19th and 20th centuries.

Description of Elective Courses in Logic, Philosophy and History of Science

PHIL 253 Introduction to deductive Logic:

Logic as a formal science; inference, implication, validity and truth; syllogism. Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

PHIL 291 History of Scince I:

A general survey of the development of science from Greeks to Newton.

PHIL 292 History of Science II:

Science in the 20th Century.

PHIL 350 Rhetoric and Argumentation in Philosophy:

Studies on the relationship between rhetoric and logical reasoning.

PHIL 393 Basic History of Science I:

Special topics in history of science.

PHIL 394 Basic History of Science II:

Continuation of PHIL 393.

PHIL 395 History of Biology:

Development of biology from the 12th century until the 19th century.

PHIL 397 History of Physics:

Development of physics from the 13th century until the 17th century.

PHIL 451 Problems of Metaphysics:

A survey of the main problems of metaphysics.

Minor Programs

Minor Program in Logic and Philosophy of Science

The Logic and Philosophy of Science Minor primarily aims at developing philosophical skills of undergraduate students in Natural Science and Engineering programs. One purpose of this Minor is to contribute to the broadening of these students' understanding of the conceptual foundations of science in general and specific natural sciences in particular.

Since logic teaches techniques of correct reasoning, the general purpose of the Logic and Philosophy of Science Minor is to enhance students' reasoning skills and thus to increase their efficiency in problem solving in their own disciplines. Logic is also recognized as the foundational study of the so-called Formal Sciences such as Mathematics and Computer Science. Therefore, the Logic and Philosophy of Science Minor also aims at contributing to the students' understanding of the conceptual foundations of the Formal-Disciplines they are studying.

However, Logic is by no means confined to Mathematical disciplines, since correct reasoning is essential to any field of study.Thus, the Logic and Philosophy of Science Minor could be recommended to undergraduate students of all departments of the University.

Required Courses    
PHIL 103 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (4-0)4
PHIL 203 Modern Logic I (4-0)4
PHIL 381 Scientific Method I (3-0)3
PHIL 382 Scientific Method II (3-0)3
  Departmental Elective (3-0)3
  Departmental Elective (3-0)3

 

Minor Programs in History of Philosophy

The objective of the History of Philosophy Minor is to provide philosophico-historical perspective especially to Human and Social Science majors in their professional studies. The need for such a background arises from the fact that a deep understanding of the basic concepts of Human and Social Sciences, in particular those pertaining to Psychology, Sociology, Education, Politics, Economics, Literature and the Fine Arts, requires philosophical scrutiny of these concepts. The reason for demanding a historical perspective is that knowledge of development and change of these concepts through time is very important for a complete understanding of these notions at present. Nevertheless the History of Philosophy Minor could also be recommended to students from all Departments of the University, because a broad historico-philosophical outlook is useful for a deeper appreciation of scientific and mathematical concepts as well.

Required Courses    
PHIL 145 History of Ancient Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 341 History of 17th and 18th Cent. Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 342 History of 17th and 18th Cent. Philosophy II (3-0)3
  Departmental Elective (4-0)4
  Departmental Elective (4-0)4
  Departmental Elective (3-0)3

 

Double Major Program

Philosophy Department Double Major Program

Required Courses

According to third article of directive for undergraduate double major programs, the double major program consists of all the courses of the major program of our department.

Directive for undergraduate double major programs;
http://www.oidb.metu.edu.tr/english/regulations/ddoublem.html