Curriculum

Undergraduate

Undergraduate Curriculum

I. Semester    
     
PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 103 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (4-0)4
PHIL 145 History of Ancient Philosophy I (3-0)3
ENG 101 Development of Reading and Writing Skills I (4-0)4
TURK 101 Turkish I NC
  Departmental Elective  
     
II. Semester    
     
PHIL 108 Introduction to Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 146 History of Ancient Philosophy II (3-0)3
ENG 102 Development of Reading and Writing Skills II (4-0)4
TURK 102 Turkish NC
IS 100 Introduction to Information Technologies and Applications NC
  Departmental Elective  
  Departmental Elective  
     
III. Semester    
     
PHIL 201 Ethics I (4-0)4
PHIL 203 Modern Logics I (4-0)4
ENG 211 Advanced Reading and Oral Communication (3-0)3
HIST 2201 Principles of Kemal Atatürk I NC
  Departmental Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
IV.Semester    
     
PHIL 248 Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (4-0)4
PHIL 282 History of Science (4-0)4
HIST 2202 Principles of Kemal Atatürk NC
  Departmental Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
V. Semester    
     
PHIL 341 History of 17th and 18th Centuries Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 381 Scientific Method I (3-0)3
  Free Elective  
  Free Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
VI. Semester    
     
PHIL 342 History of 17th and 18th Centuries Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 382 Scientific Method II (3-0)3
  Free Elective (3-0)3
  Free Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
VII. Semester    
     
PHIL 405 Philosophy of Language (4-0)4
PHIL 441 Contemporary Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 491 Computer Use in Philosophy (3-0)3
  Departmental Elective  
  Non-Departmental Elective  
     
VIII. Semester    
     
PHIL 442 Contemporary Philosophy II (4-0)4
  Departmental Elective  
  Departmental Elective  
  Departmental Elective  
  Free Elective  

 

Undergraduate Course Description

Description of Undergraduate Courses in Systematic Philosophy and Logic

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy I:

An introductory survey of the main problems of philosophy.

PHIL 103 Introduction to Symbolic Logic:

Sentential and quantificational logic. Symbolization and tableau method of proof. Modalities.

PHIL 104 Traditional Logic:

A survey of basic concepts in Aristotelian, Stoic and Medieval Islamic Logic.

PHIL 106 Theory of Knowledge I:

Logico-philosophical analysis of knowledge and belief.

PHIL 108 Introduction Philosophy II:

Continuation of PHIL 101.

PHIL 201 Ethics I:

Problems of moral conduct. Theories of ethics.

PHIL 202 Aesthetics:

Study of the nature of beauty, art and creativity, artistic appreciation and criticism.

PHIL 203 Modern Logic I:

First-order logic with identity and modal logic.

PHIL 204 Theory of Knowledge II:

Common-sense knowledge and scientific knowledge. The growth of knowledge; rationality and progress.

PHIL 205 Basic Philosophy of Science:

Scientific concepts, measurement, prediction, explanation, laws, theories.

PHIL 206 Philosophy of Natural Science:

Inroduction to the philosophical problems of natural science.

PHIL 301 Modern Logic II:

Application of logic to axiomatic set theory.

PHIL 302 Systematic Philosophy:

Metaphilosophical analysis of philosophical problems and solutions. The methods of logical analysis and logical reconstruction.

PHIL 304 Ethics II:

Study of ethical and metaethical theories.

PHIL 401 Modern Logic II:

Philosophical logic: Modal, epistemic, and deontic logics.

PHIL 402 Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics:

The nature of logic and mathematics. Necessary truths and existence in logic and mathematics. Logicism, intuitionism, and formalism.

PHIL 404 Philosophy of State and Society:

Problems in the philosophy of social science and in political philosophy.

PHIL 405 Philosophy of Language:

Oridinary language and formal languages. Syntax, semantics, pragmatics. Extention and intension. Naming and predication. Theory of reference and theory of meaning.

PHIL 407 Philosophy of Mind I:

Study of the mind-body problem and the problem of free will and determinism. Survey of the main theories of mind and human action.

PHIL 408 Philosophy of Mind II:

Continuation of PHIL 407.

Description of Undergraduate Courses in History of Philosophy

PHIL 145 History of Ancient Philosphy I:

Survey of the Western Philosophy from Thales to the Sophists.

PHIL 146 History of Ancient Philosophy II:

Study of Western Philosophy from Socrates to Neoplatonism.

PHIL 241 Philosophical Texts I:

Study of major texts in philosophy.

PHIL 242 Philosophical Texts II:

Study of major texts in philosphy.

PHIL 245 Mediveal Philosphy:

An introductory survey of major problems in mediveal philosophy.

PHIL 248 Mediveal and Renaissance Philosophy:

Survey of post-Aristotelian and mediveal philosphies. Philosophy in the Renaissance; Humanism; controversy between the Platonists and the Aristotelians; scepticism, and Reformation.

PHIL 341 History of 17th and 18th Century Philosophy I:

A study of Continental Philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries with special emphasis on Rationalism, Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz.

PHIL 342 History of 17th and 18th Philosophy II:

Anglo-Saxon philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries. Locke, Berkeley and Hume.

PHIL 345 Philosophical Texts III:

Study of major texts in philosophy.

PHIL 346 Philosophical Texts IV:

Study of major texts in philosophy.

PHIL 441 Contemporary Philosophy I:

The Kantian influence. Positivism, naturalism, pragmatism, neo-positivism.

PHIL 442 Contemporary II:

Phenomenological analysis and existential perspective. Analytic philosophy. Hermeneutic philosophy.

PHIL 443 Islamic Philosophers:

Text-oriented study of some major Islamic philosophers.

PHIL 444 The 19th Century Philosophy:

A survey of Anglo-Saxon and Continental Philosophies of the 19th Century.

Description of Undergraduate Courses in History of Science

PHIL 182 Introduction to History of Science:

Historical study in the development of science.

PHIL 282 History of Science:

Problems of the development of science through history.

PHIL 381 Scientific Method I:

Observation and experimentation. Induction, deduction and the hypothetico-deductive method. Scientific hypotheses, laws and theories.

PHIL 382 Scientific Method II:

Continuation of PHIL 381.

PHIL 383 History of Science II:

Development of science in Middle Ages.

PHIL 481 History of Science III:

Development of science the in 18th, and 19th and 20th centuries.

Description of Elective Courses in Logic, Philosophy and History of Science

PHIL 253 Introduction to deductive Logic:

Logic as a formal science; inference, implication, validity and truth; syllogism. Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

PHIL 291 History of Scince I:

A general survey of the development of science from Greeks to Newton.

PHIL 292 History of Science II:

Science in the 20th Century.

PHIL 350 Rhetoric and Argumentation in Philosophy:

Studies on the relationship between rhetoric and logical reasoning.

PHIL 393 Basic History of Science I:

Special topics in history of science.

PHIL 394 Basic History of Science II:

Continuation of PHIL 393.

PHIL 395 History of Biology:

Development of biology from the 12th century until the 19th century.

PHIL 397 History of Physics:

Development of physics from the 13th century until the 17th century.

PHIL 451 Problems of Metaphysics:

A survey of the main problems of metaphysics.

Minor Programs

Minor Program in Logic and Philosophy of Science

The Logic and Philosophy of Science Minor primarily aims at developing philosophical skills of undergraduate students in Natural Science and Engineering programs. One purpose of this Minor is to contribute to the broadening of these students' understanding of the conceptual foundations of science in general and specific natural sciences in particular.

Since logic teaches techniques of correct reasoning, the general purpose of the Logic and Philosophy of Science Minor is to enhance students' reasoning skills and thus to increase their efficiency in problem solving in their own disciplines. Logic is also recognized as the foundational study of the so-called Formal Sciences such as Mathematics and Computer Science. Therefore, the Logic and Philosophy of Science Minor also aims at contributing to the students' understanding of the conceptual foundations of the Formal-Disciplines they are studying.

However, Logic is by no means confined to Mathematical disciplines, since correct reasoning is essential to any field of study.Thus, the Logic and Philosophy of Science Minor could be recommended to undergraduate students of all departments of the University.

Required Courses    
PHIL 103 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (4-0)4
PHIL 203 Modern Logic I (4-0)4
PHIL 381 Scientific Method I (3-0)3
PHIL 382 Scientific Method II (3-0)3
  Departmental Elective (3-0)3
  Departmental Elective (3-0)3

 

Minor Programs in History of Philosophy

The objective of the History of Philosophy Minor is to provide philosophico-historical perspective especially to Human and Social Science majors in their professional studies. The need for such a background arises from the fact that a deep understanding of the basic concepts of Human and Social Sciences, in particular those pertaining to Psychology, Sociology, Education, Politics, Economics, Literature and the Fine Arts, requires philosophical scrutiny of these concepts. The reason for demanding a historical perspective is that knowledge of development and change of these concepts through time is very important for a complete understanding of these notions at present. Nevertheless the History of Philosophy Minor could also be recommended to students from all Departments of the University, because a broad historico-philosophical outlook is useful for a deeper appreciation of scientific and mathematical concepts as well.

Required Courses    
PHIL 145 History of Ancient Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 341 History of 17th and 18th Cent. Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 342 History of 17th and 18th Cent. Philosophy II (3-0)3
  Departmental Elective (4-0)4
  Departmental Elective (4-0)4
  Departmental Elective (3-0)3

 

Double Major Program

Philosophy Department Double Major Program

Required Courses

According to third article of directive for undergraduate double major programs, the double major program consists of all the courses of the major program of our department.

Directive for undergraduate double major programs;
http://www.oidb.metu.edu.tr/english/regulations/ddoublem.html

Masters

Graduate Programs and Exams

The Application to the programs in the Graduate School of Social Sciences will be made online in the link provided (https://oibs2.metu.edu.tr/Ms_Phd_Applications)

Applicants DO NOT need to deliver the required documents (hard-copies) to the Graduate School of Social Sciences.

 

You can get information about application to graduate programs from the web page of the Graduate School of Social Sciences under the "APPLICATION" menu.

 

Students applying for admission to our M.A. or Ph.D. program are required to take a written exam and an interview.  We have several versions of the interview: the interview given to the applicants of the M.A. program is different from the one given to the Ph.D. program applicants, and for each degree program we make up different interview for those students who have had formal training in philosophy and for those have not. Furthermore, the applicant in any category has the option to take the interview in English or Turkish. The interview designed for applicants without any formal background in philosophy does not contain questions on highly specific philosophical issues requiring a lot of knowledge of philosophy. On the other hand, the interview given to applicants who have majored in philosophy previously will be a little more demanding in terms of "philosophical knowledge"; nevertheless, they will be asked questions of a general nature, about issues which any philosophy graduate should know about.  Through the interview, the interview committee will try to sense if the applicant has any real interest in and serious intent to study philosophy, and of course, has the ability to finish the degree.  If you satisfy these basic requirements, you really don’t need to worry about getting admitted to the program. There is no scheme of preparation, no reading list or any "key to success" for the interview that the department recommends to applicants. We want you to come as you are...

Since English is the medium of instruction at the Middle East Technical University, applicants to any graduate program of the university are required to pass the English Proficiency Exam administered by the university. Applicants with adequate TOEFL or similar test scores don't have to take the English Proficiency Exam, and applicants who carry the passport of an English-speaking country are exempt from any such proof of proficiency in English.

In order to be admitted to any graduate program in a university in Turkey, students have to take the ALES. ALES is administered by a government organization twice a year. It is similar in nature to the GRE Aptitude Test, and it is in Turkish. Non-Turkish citizens are normally expected to take the GRE in place of ALES.
 

Required Documents for Application

Detailed information about required Documents which will be uploaded to the online application system:

 Application Fee Receipt

 English Proficiency Exams

 Graduate Exams

 Reference Letters

 Transcript

 Letter of Intention

 

Application Criteria

 

Degrees

 

Graduate Exams

 

English Proficiency Exams

 

Letter of

 

Intention

 

Reference Letters

 

cGPA

ALES

GRE

ODTÜ-İYS

TOEFL-IBT

IELTS

MA

(with Thesis)

EA 65

Quantitative

 685

 

69.5

 86

7.0

English

or

Turkish

 

2*

-

PhD

EA 70

Quantitative 708

 

75

 92

7.0

English

or

Turkish

 

2*

-

*Except from METU Philosophy graduates should submit.

All applicants are invited for an interview without a pre-evaluation.

Masters Curriculum

     
  Required Courses  
PHIL 504 Prothesis Seminar NC
PHIL 551 Advanced Logic I (3-0)3
PHIL 599 Master's Thesis NC
PHIL 800-899 Special Studies NC
     
     
  Elective Courses  
PHIL 505 Confirmation of Scientific Theories I (3-0)3
PHIL 506 Confirmation of Scientific Theories II (3-0)3
PHIL 507 Philosophical Logic I (3-0)3
PHIL 508 Philosophical Logic II (3-0)3
PHIL 510 Topics in Epistemology (3-0)3
PHIL 511 Graduate Readings in Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 512 Graduate Readings in Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 513 Graduate Readings in Philosophy III (3-0)3
PHIL 514 Graduate Readings in Philosophy IV (3-0)3
PHIL 515 Philosophy of Technology I (3-0)3
PHIL 516 Philosophy of Technology II (3-0)3
PHIL 517 Philosophy of Communication I (3-0)3
PHIL 518 Philosophy of Communication II (3-0)3
PHIL 521 Studies in the History of Science I (3-0)3
PHIL 522 Studies in the History of Science II (3-0)3
PHIL 523 Studies in the Philosophy of Science I (3-0)3
PHIL 524 Studies in the Philosophy of Science II (3-0)3
PHIL 525 Measurement and Evaluation (3-0)3
PHIL 527 Philosophy in Science (3-0)3
PHIL 529 Philosophy of Biology (3-0)3
PHIL 530 Studies in Greek Philosophy: Helenistic Philosophers (3-0)3
PHIL 531 Studies in Greek Philosophy: Aristotle (3-0)3
PHIL 532 Studies in Greek Philosophy: Plato (3-0)3
PHIL 533 Introduction to Phenomenology (3-0)3
PHIL 534 Introduction to the Thought of Heidegger (3-0)3
PHIL 535 Introduction to the Thought of Nietzsche (3-0)3
PHIL 536 Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Art (3-0)3
PHIL 537 Kant's Critical Philosophy of Art and Nature (3-0)3
PHIL 538 Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy and Technology (3-0)3
PHIL 540 Special Issues in Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 541 Special Issues in Islamic Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 542 Special Issues in Islamic Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 544 Special Issues in Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 545 Graduate Readings Turkish-Islamic Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 546 Graduate Readings Turkish-Islamic Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 548 Twentieth-Century Philosophy and Literature (3-0)3
PHIL 550 Major Philosophers I (3-0)3
PHIL 552 Advanced Logic II (3-0)3
PHIL 553 Scientific Explanation (3-0)3
PHIL 554 Scientific Concepts and Theories (3-0)3
PHIL 555 Analytic Philosophy and the Analytic Tradition (3-0)3
PHIL 556 Major Philosophers II (3-0)3
PHIL 560 Studies in Political Philosophy and Ethics: Contractarianism (3-0)3
PHIL 571 Eco-Philosophy: Philosophy of Environment I (3-0)3
PHIL 572 Eco-Philosophy: Philosophy of Environment II (3-0)3
PHIL 580 Bioethics and Biopolitics: New Dimensions in Moral Philosophy (3-0)3

 

Description of Courses in MS. Program

PHIL 501 Research Methods:

An advanced paper-writing workshop aiming to teach students methods and techniques of research and publication in philosophy.

PHIL 504 Prothesis Seminar:

A seminar to be given by each Master’s degree candidate related to her/his thesis topic.

PHIL 505 Confirmation of Scientific Theories I:

The hypothetico-deductive, Bayesian, and "bootstrapping"models of theory confirmation. Importance of idealizations and approximations for confirmation in science. The problem of old evidence.

PHIL 506 Confirmation of Scientific Theories II:

A continuation of PHIL 505.

PHIL 507 Philosophical Logic I:

Modal and intentional logics. Tense Logic, Epistemic Logic, Deontic Logic.

PHIL 508 Philosophical Logic II:

A continuation of PHIL 507.

PHIL 510 Topics in Epistemology:

Study of selected topics in epistemology.

PHIL 511 Graduate Readings in Philosophy I:

Examination of major philosophical texts in history and social sciences.

PHIL 512 Graduate Readings in Philosophy II:

A continuation of PHIL 511. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

PHIL 513 Graduate Readings in Philosophy III:

A continuation of PHIL 512.

PHIL 514 Graduate Readings in Philosophy IV:

A continuation of PHIL 513.

PHIL 515 Philosophy of Technology I:

Technology assessment, technoaxiology, responsibility of increased technological power, historical, epistemological, and metaphysical problems regarding technology, information and computers, the problems of philosophy of technology as a recently emerged philosophical discipline.

PHIL 516 Philosophy of Technology II:

A continuation of PHIL 515.

PHIL 517 Philosophy of Communication I:

The course aims at: 1) Improving the student's understanding of the problems of communication stemming from the relationship between language, truth, rationality and intentionality of human action; 2) to increase his knowledge of the theory and use of argumentative discourse in philosophical and practical problems. To this end, this course will proportinally focus on traditional (ancient, mediveal, modern) and contemporary approaches to philosophy of communication and their solutions to various communication problems.

PHIL 518 Philosophy of Communication II:

A continuation of PHIL 517.

PHIL 521 Studies in the History of Science I:

Studies in change of scientific theories in historical perspective.

PHIL 522 Studies in the History of Science II:

A continuation of PHIL 521.

PHIL 523 Studies in Philosophy of Science I:

Discussion of various problems in contemporary philosophy of science. Critical assessment of recent philosophical views on these issues.

PHIL 524 Studies in Philosophy of Science II:

A continuation of PHIL 523.

PHIL 525 Measurement and Evaluation:

Continuous and discrete variables. Intensive and extensive qualities. Scales of measurement. The logic of evaluation.

PHIL 527 Philosophy in Science:

The Logical Empiricist Philosophy of science. The origins of Logical Empiricism. Confirmation. Theoretical terms. Explanation. Falsification. The new image of science. Perception and theory. Presuppositions in science. Scientific revolutions. Context of discovery and context of justification. Some basic epistemological and metaphysical problems in science. Rationality. Scientific knowledge and scientific truth.

PHIL 529 Philosophy of Biology:

This course offers a survey and critical examination of basic issues in the philosophy of biology: a brief history of biology and the philosophy of biology; the nature of evolutionary theory, with special reference to the status of natural selection; the rise of genetics; the scientific status of evolutionary theory; biological teleology; the implications of biology for human kind; the problem of reduction; the significance of Human Genome Project; challenges to the adaptationist programme; ethical and social issues, including the status of neo-Creationism(Intelligent Design).

PHIL 530 Studies in Greek Philosophy: Hellenistic Philosophers:

A study of extant by the Hellenistic philosophers. Topics of special interest are the problem of criteria of truth and questions concerning ethics. The texts from which selections will be read are: Epicurus’ letters, Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, Sextus Empiricus’ Outlines of Pyrrhonism and Diogenes Laertius’ Lives of Eminent Philosophers.

PHIL 531 Studies in Greek Philosophy: Aristotle:

This course is designed to conduct further research into the philosophy of Aristotle, so as to do an advanced study of the main ethical text of Aristotle, the Nicomachean Ethics.

PHIL 532 Studies in Greek Philosophy: Plato:

This course is designed to conduct further research into the philosophy of Plato, so as to do an advanced study of the main ethical text of Plato, the Republic.

PHIL 533 Introduction to Phenomenology:

Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty; introduction to their major concepts, methods and texts; how to practice phenomenological seeing; twentieth century developments following on from phenomenology.

PHIL 534 Introduction to the Thought of Heidegger:

Introduction to some of the major concepts, methods and texts of Heidegger; his early phenomenological work; his late thought on technology, language, poetry; later developments- in deconstruction, architecture, cognitive science - following on from his philosophy.

PHIL 535 Introduction to the Thought of Nietzsche:

PHIL 536 Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Art:

PHIL 537 Kant's Critical Philosophy of Art and Nature:

PHIL 538 Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy and Technology:

Conceptions of and responses to the provocation of technology in twentieth-century Continental thought; human beings and technology - mutual effects; the changing self-understanding of human being amidst modern technology; influential understandings of twentieth-century technology in the work of Heidegger, Canguilhem, Deleuze and Guattari, and De Landa.

PHIL 540 Special Issues in Philosophy I:

Studies in the formalization of a particular philosophical system or problem.

PHIL 541 Special Issues in Islamic Philosophy I:

Immanent issues in Islamic philosophy with solutions by important phşlosphers such as Al Farabi, Ibn Sina, Ghazzali, Sadra and Ibn Arabi.

PHIL 542 Special Issues in Islamic Philosophy II:

A continuation of PHIL 541.

PHIL 544 Special Issues in Philosophy II:

A continuation of PHIL 540.

PHIL 545 Graduate Readings in Turkish-Islamic Philosophy I:

Selected readings from the works of immanentist. Turkish and Islamic philosophers such as Farabi, Ibn Sina, Ibn Rushd, Mevlana, Sadr ald-Din, al Quarawi and Kemal Pashazade.

PHIL 546 Graduate Readings in Turkish-Islamic Philosophy II:

A continuation of PHIL 545.

PHIL 548 Twentieth-Century Philosophy and Literature:

How can we understand language in general? What is distinctive about the language of literature? Some major statements on language and literature in twentieth-century thought; the central role of Kafka for that thought; thought expressed in philosophy and in literature; the influential concept of a `minor` literature; philosophical writers, e.g. Rilke, Beckett.

PHIL 550 Major Philosophers I:

Intensive study of the work of a major philosopher with a view to delineating the significance for the whole body of philosophical knowledge.

PHIL 551 Advanced Logic I:

Proof theory and model theory of formal systems. Recursion theory.

PHIL 552 Advanced Logic II:

A continuation of PHIL 551.

PHIL 553 Scientific Explanation:

The nature and methods of science. Scientific laws and lawlike statements. The principle of causality. Logical analysis of scientific explanation. Kinds of explanation. Critical appraisal of current views on scientific explanation.

PHIL 554 Scientific Concepts and Theories:

Concept formation: Definition in science, classificatory, comparative, and quantitative concepts. Observation language, theoretical language, and correspondence rules. The problem of theoretical terms. The nature of scientific theories and models.

PHIL 555 Analytic Philosophy and the Analytic Tradition:

The forerunners and the founders of the Analytic Tradition. The Logical Empiricists. The ordinary-language and the formal-language philosophy. Definition of analytic philosophy; philosophy and science; philosophical analysis of metaphysical knowledge claims; the empirical criterion of meaning.

PHIL 556 Major Philosophers II:

A continuation of PHIL 550.

PHIL 560 Studies in Political Philosophy and Ethics: Contractarianism:

A study of the philosophical issues of the theories of “social contract”. The main topic of discussions is the concept of “agreement” (contract, compact and covenant) as one of the principal explanatory tools for political theory and ethics. The texts from which selections will be read are the writings of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, David Hume, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant and John Rawls.

PHIL 571 Eco-Philosophy: Philosophy of Environment I:

Philosophical discussions of environmental problems.

PHIL 572 Eco-Philosophy: Philosophy of Environment II:

A continuation of PHIL 571.

PHIL 580 Bioethics and Biopolitics:

New moral issues involved in the transformation of Ethics in our time. Inquiry in value problems in different settings such as biomedical activity and man-nature relationship. Biopolitics as ethical study of environmental (ecological) issues with man's impact on the biosphere as the origin.

PHIL 599 Master's Thesis:

PHIL 800-899 Special Studies:

Evening M.A. Program in Applied Ethics (without Thesis), (Second Education)

1. The Aim of the Program

 

Why do we need ethics? Why does applied ethics matter? It matters because we will not survive the 21st century with the 20th century ethics. Academics, professionals, engineers and many other people in business, media, education, public service, Law, Medicine confront many ethical issues in their daily work. The immense power of modern technology, business, and media extends globally. Many decisions taken by those professionals guide and shape our society. A good decision can benefit millions, but an unethical one can cripple our future. So while an understanding of ethics has become an integral and indispensable part of the training and education expected of academics, professionals, engineers, social workers, and leaders, it is not always delivered as part of their formal education.

 

The Philosophy Department’s graduate program in Applied Ethics at Middle East Technical University is designed to fill this gap, which links analytic and foundational studies in applied ethics with case studies and concrete problems arising in public and professional life. The features of this program are intended to prepare professionals for ethical decision making and for a greater sensitivity towards ethical issues in their professional lives. Thus, the program offers a unique complementary formal education in applied ethics.

 

2. Admission Requirements

 

The requirements for the admission to the program are listed at the web page of the Graduate School of Social Sciences (APPLICATION). In addition to those requirements, recommendation letters and an interview shall be taken into account. Moreover, those candidates who are currently working or with prior experience in professional life will have a priority in admission to the program.

 

3. Description of the Program

 

The program is designed to appeal to professionals of all sectors, public and private.

 

The Student enrolling in this program will take five core courses, which aim to equip her/him with the basic knowledge necessary to understand and evaluate theoretical, historical and applied aspects of ethical knowledge. Moreover, the student must take five elective courses with the approval of her/his advisor(s). The program project is to be taken after the completion of course work. The program, if completed successfully, will yield a M.A. degree (without thesis) in Applied Ethics. The program must be completed at most in six semesters.

 

3.1. Degree Requirements

 

The requirements for the degree by course work are shown below:

 

Core Courses:

 

PHIL 581: Research Methods in Applied Ethics

 

PHIL 582: Ethics and Value I: Theoretical

 

PHIL 583: Ethics and Value II: Applied

 

PHIL 584: Ethics of Argument and Persuasion

 

PHIL 585: Ethics and Decision Making

 

PHIL 589: Term Project

 

Elective Courses:

 

PHIL 586: Ethics and Computer Technology

 

PHIL 587: Ethics of Discourse

 

PHIL 588: Environmental Ethics

 

PHIL 590: Ethics and Self-Awareness

 

PHIL 591: Media Ethics I: Theoretical

 

PHIL 592: Media Ethics II: Applied (Prerequisite: PHIL591)

 

PHIL 593: Media Ethics III: Research on Case Studies

 

PHIL 594: Ethics in Organizations I: Theoretical

 

PHIL 595: Ethics in Organizations II: Applied (Prerequisite: PHIL 594)

 

PHIL 596: Ethics in Organizations III: Research on Case Studies

 

PHIL 597: Business Ethics

 

3.2 Course Descriptions

 

 

3.2.1 Core Courses:

 

PHIL 581: Research Methods in Applied Ethics (3-0)3

 

This course starts with an assumption: Research Method in Applied Ethics is qualitative and is based upon rules perspective. The reason for this assumption is that in ethics, both descriptive and prescriptive (normative) methods are inadequate. The former reduces ideas to law-like generalizations of behaviour, while the latter gives a fixed catalogue of recipe-like collection of norms. As a third alternative, rules approach assumes that at the rule-governed level of ethical conduct, rules provide form for the ethical behaviour, while reducing neither ideas nor action to secondary status. Any and every field of applied ethics may be considered as a field of consensus over some rules. A code of ethics, in this sense carries properties unique to rules, and not to law-like generalizations. A code of ethics as a "rule" first of all, has normative power, i.e., it tells us how to "correct" our behavior once we deviate from it. A rule in this sense is a criterion of making a choice. Secondly, a rule must have generality. It must be simple enough to apply to a wide range of cases. Thirdly, a rule must have necessity, i.e., must invoke, in the parties involved, a sense of obligation. The subject's "feeling of obligation" or of "normative necessity" plus his performative act of obedience to "rules" is nothing but the "closure" of the structure called a "code of ethics". Collection of a particular group of such structures for a particular field (such as media, business, environment, etc.) will constitute a part of the grammar of applied ethics.

 

The first part of this course examines the concept of rule and related concepts such as "rule governed behavior", "normative power", "constitutive-regulative rules" and answers to such questions as "What are the analytic (a priori) and empirical aspects of a rule?" "What is the logical make up of a rule?" "What are the relationships between rules and performative actions?" etc.

 

The second part of the course aims at making explicit the connections between a code of ethic and a rule. Two major attempts at taxonomy of constitutive-regulative rules (Searle and Habermas) will be given as illustration. The students are expected to develop similar taxonomies for the concrete cases when they take Research on Case Studies (PHIL 593 and 596).

 

This course is the regulative back-bone for the other courses whose contents are about theoretical or practical aspects of the grammar of applied ethics.

 

PHIL 582: Ethics and Value: Theoretical (3-0)3

 

The very continuity of the social order suggests that there is some degree of agreement about values, or at least some conformity to common principles of action. If so, the problem of philosophical reflection becomes one of deciding what our value commitments are and whether they can be defended as rational. The aim of this introductory course will be to pursue such reflection in conjunction with a reading and discussion of texts by major thinkers of the past (e.g., Aristotle, Plato, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche). The course will thus categorize, classify and summarize some of the major ethical theories such as subjectivism, objectivism, conventionalism, utilitarianism, the appeal to nature, the appeal to the golden rule, Kantianism, egoism, etc. The main focus will be to identify the criterion of rationality that these theories imply.

 

PHIL 583: Ethics and Value II: Applied (3-0)3 [Prerequisite: PHIL 582]

 

The course will begin with consideration of various arguments encountered in everyday life on ethical or moral issues. After developing some skill in identifying ethical and moral arguments and disagreements, major competing ethical theories that the students studied in PHIL 582 will be applied to these moral problems. In order to fulfill this aim, several concrete and pressing contemporary moral problems will be chosen such as birth control, abortion, capital punishment, etc. The students will be encouraged to write and think clearly about these problems, weighing alternative solutions and criticizing those which are weak or untenable. The main focus will be to provide the student with the skills necessary to identify a moral problem and to introduce her/him to critical philosophical thinking over moral issues.

 

PHIL 584: Ethics of Argument and Persuasion (3-0)3

 

The connection between argument and ethics is an old one: Aristotle in his Rhetoricswrote that rhetorics was an offshoot of ethical studies. Modern persuasive techniques such as advertising methods, mass media, Internet, etc., make this connection between ethics and argument more problematic than the ancient time of Aristotle. Some people take the position that all persuasion is unethical. This school of thought finds intellectual support in the writings of Plato. Other people, coming from the tradition of Aristotle make a distinction between ethical and unethical persuasion. The first part of this course will review these theoretical views on persuasive arguments. The thinkers, whom this course examines, include ancients (Plato, Aristotle, Cicero) as well as moderns (Weaver, Toulmin, Habermas....) ones.

 

The second part of this course takes a closer look at the questions "When is it ethical to persuade?" and "How are such arguments constructed?" The students will be encouraged to write and think clearly on some ordinary life examples of ethical and unethical arguments and to apply certain models of constructing arguments to these examples.

 

PHIL 585: Ethics and Decision Making (3-0)3

 

Ethical dilemmas and conflicts confront business managers, public administrators, and other professionals, as well as ordinary individuals, on a daily basis. How to avoid making decisions based upon prejudice and emotion? How to make rational decisions under insufficient information or under risk? Decision theory is concerned with models of decision-making by rational individuals. The subject has lately become relevant not only to economics, philosophy of science, and theory of rationality, but also to management science, political philosophy, and ethics. This course, which assumes no knowledge of mathematics beyond high-school algebra, provides an introduction to the fundamentals of decision theory, paying attention to matters of ethical and social choice.

 

PHIL 589: Term Project (3-0)3

 

Each student will be asked to pursue an individual MA Term Project on applied ethics by using all the conceptual tools so far acquired.

 

 

3.2.2 Elective Courses:

 

PHIL 586: Ethics and Computer Technology (3-0)3

 

This course examines central ethical issues involved in the production and use of computer and computer based communication and information technologies. We will begin by introducing certain philosophical problems related to the peculiarities of computer use and communication through the Web and proceed to case discussions on ethical topics like privacy, right to access to information, property rights, hacking, professional ethical codes, reliability and security.

 

PHIL 587: Ethics of Discourse (3-0)3

 

Ethics of Discourse is an important movement in twentieth century philosophy. Philosophers like Apel and Habermas regard discourse ethics as a basis for establishing norms. Norms are a matter of consensus of the equal participants of discourse and not a question of a privileged subject. This course examines discourse theory of ethics and its practical applications.

 

PHIL 588: Environmental Ethics (3-0)3

 

Environmental ethics is a controversial area in applied ethics in at least three respects: complexity of environment, conflict of interest in environment, and human centered ethical traditions, concepts and theories neglecting the non-human environment. So, while uncertainty and conflict of interest increase the demands on ethical principles, the basic assumptions of traditional ethics are difficult to extend to the non-human environment. For example, people have rights, but do other (higher) animals? Do even plants have an interest? Can only individuals deserve to be subjects of moral considerations or can groups of individuals, such as species and ecosystems also be included into moral consideration? What is our fair share of the atmosphere? These and similar questions are treated by both anthropocentrists and ecocentrists.

 

PHIL 590: Ethics and Self-Awareness (3-0)3

 

Contemporary ethics either examines the language of morality or argue about the comparative merits of pragmatic ethics, Kantian ethics and utilitarianism. All of these ethical positions presuppose that human beings are free to direct their own lives and take full responsibility for both the values they hold and actions they perform. They assume that humans can become fully aware of the forces motivating them, determine which of these forces are ethically superior to others and act on the basis of this awareness. This creates an important gap in ethics. The failure of ethicists to respond to the discovery of the unconscious and the relevance of psychotherapy to question fully the values of ethics has meant that we have lived with two isolated discourses concerning human agency in our culture. In this course, by rethinking and reformulating the primary concepts and categories of ethics, the gap between traditional ethics and psychology of the unconscious will be bridged.

 

PHIL 591: Media Ethics I: Theoretical (3-0)3

 

Existing global attempts to develop a grammar of media ethics.

 

The first part of this course will be a theoretical overview of world literature in media ethics. The nature of ethical problems in mass media and journalism will be examined. Code of ethics concerning accountability of the media, fabrication, plagiarism, veiled attribution, conflict of interests, individual privacy vs. public interest, etc., will be critically assessed. The three criteria developed in the Research Methods (PHIL 581), namely, generality, necessity, and power will be used in this evaluation.

 

The second part of this course will examine the ethical aspects of information technology, media imperialism and the question of "Global Conversation".

 

The final part of this course will review the international efforts (by UNESCO, European Community, etc.) to develop supra-national codes of ethics in the above-mentioned areas of moral problems in media. The three criteria mentioned above (generality, necessity, power) will be used to evaluate these codes of ethics.

 

This course constitutes the basis of the applied courses (PHIL 592-593) in media ethics.

 

PHIL 592: Media Ethics II: Applied (3-0)3 [Prerequisite: PHIL 591]

 

The existing situation of the grammar of media ethics in Turkey.

 

This course is continuation of PHIL 591. Added to the student’s prior knowledge, a series of bi-weekly seminars will enable her/him to see the ethical problems in media in concrete setting and from the angle of its practitioners. To this aim, guest speakers from both media, universities and other media-related organizations will be invited to these seminars. The instructor of this course has the task of organizing and monitoring these seminars and getting the students actively participate into them. The seminar reports written by the students will be discussed and critically evaluated by the class during the week following each seminar, and will constitute the basis for her/his performance evaluation.

 

PHIL 593: Media Ethics III: Research on Case Studies (3-0)3 [Prerequisite: PHIL 581]

 

Each student's individual attempt to contribute to grammar of media ethics.

 

Each student taking this course will choose, at the beginning of the semester, a case study in a field of media ethics (developed in detail in PHIL 591). Case studies may be chosen from both national and international events such as "Susurluk", "Watergate", "Zippergate", "Marmara Earthquake", etc. Students will present weekly papers towards reconstruction and evaluation of the pro and con arguments in relation to moral problems involved in the reflection of these events on media. Based on her/his knowledge of research methods (PHIL 581), each student, in the end, will attempt to develop a taxonomy of codes of ethics concerning her/his choice of particular case.

 

PHIL 594: Ethics in Organizations I: Theoretical (3-0)3

 

Existing global attempts to develop a grammar of organizational ethics.

 

In the first part of this course, theories and concepts upon which organizational ethics are based will be reviewed. The nature of ethical problems, the types of ethical dilemmas which people may face in various organizational contexts will be examined. Codes of ethics concerning moral issues such as individual and corporate responsibilities, prevention of fraud and corruption, public trust will be critically addressed. The three criteria developed in the Research Methods (PHIL 581), namely, generality, necessity, and power will be used in this evaluation.

 

In the second part, ethical issues emanating from cross-cultural and international business transactions, such as the imposition of differing (or conflicting) ethical standards and requirements, in the areas of human rights, environmental issues, pollution, bribes and kick-backs will be examined.

 

In the final part of the course OECD guidelines and other attempts to develop global standards for organizational and business ethics will be critically assessed. The same criteria mentioned above (generality, necessity, power) will be used in this evaluation.

 

PHIL 595: Ethics in Organizations II: Applied (3-0)3 [Prerequisite: PHIL 594]

 

The existing situation of the grammar of organizational ethics in Turkey.

 

This course is a continuation of PHIL 594. Added to the student’s prior knowledge, a series of bi-weekly seminars will enable her/him to see the ethical problems in concrete setting and from the angle of business practitioners. To this aim, guest speakers from both public and private organizations will be invited to these seminars. The instructor of this course has the task of organizing and monitoring these seminars and getting the students actively participate into them. The seminar reports written by the students will be discussed and critically assessed by all the class during the week following each seminar, and will constitute the basis for her/his performance evaluation.

 

PHIL 596: Ethics in Organizations III: Research on Case Studies (3-0)3[Prerequisite: PHIL 581]

 

Each student's individual attempt to contribute to grammar of organizational ethics.

 

Each student taking this course will choose, at the beginning of the semester, a case study in the field of organizational ethics (developed in detail in PHIL 594). Case studies may be chosen from both national and international events and efforts. Students will present weekly papers towards reconstruction and evaluation of the pro and con arguments in relation to moral problems involved in these events. Guided by her/his knowledge of research methods (PHIL 581), each student, in the end, will attempt to develop a taxonomy of codes of ethics for her case.

 

PHIL 597: Business Ethics (3-0)3

 

The course aims to increase ethical awareness and to provide students with a better basis upon which to build their own repertoire of behaviors as managers, now or in the future. The purpose will be to enhance students’ understanding of potential ethical issues facing managers in modern organizations, the ethical dilemma which can present themselves and to suggest ways in which these dilemmas might be more effectively dealt with in the practical situation. The issue of corporate responsibility, what it means in the modern world will be explored examining various corporate violations. The course also aims to impart the reasoning and analytical skills needed to use ethical concepts in business decisions with a view of critical thinking and moral reasoning.

 

 3.3 The Advisory System

 

Two advisors are to be assigned to each student. At least one of the advisors must be a member of the Academic Committee. Advisors will be assigned by the end of the first semester.

 

 3.4 The Academic Committee and Steering Committee

 

The Academic Committee consists of the contributing staff members. The Academic Committee elects three members of the Steering Committee which will serve for two years, and these members are to be approved by the Head of the Philosophy Department. One of the members of the Steering Committee is to be chosen by the Head of the Philosophy Department as the Coordinator of the Program. The program, its content and execution shall be constantly monitored and improved by the Steering Committee.

 

4. Activities Accompanying M.A. Program in Applied Ethics:

  1. Center for Applied Ethics (in progress).
  2. Applied Ethics Certificate Program, via SEM (in progress).
  3. National Congress in Applied Ethics. (Nov.8-9. 2001, METU, Cultural Center)
  4. International Conference on Applied Ethics (Scheduled for 2001-2002.)
  5. International Project in Applied Ethics via Ministry of Foreign Affairs.(Scheduled for 2001-2002.)
  6. Textbooks and proceedings to be published via METU Press. 

Doctorate

Graduate Programs and Exams

The Application to the programs in the Graduate School of Social Sciences will be made online in the link provided (https://oibs2.metu.edu.tr/Ms_Phd_Applications)

Applicants DO NOT need to deliver the required documents (hard-copies) to the Graduate School of Social Sciences.

 

You can get information about application to graduate programs from the web page of the Graduate School of Social Sciences under the "APPLICATION" menu.

 

Students applying for admission to our M.A. or Ph.D. program are required to take a written exam and an interview.  We have several versions of the interview: the interview given to the applicants of the M.A. program is different from the one given to the Ph.D. program applicants, and for each degree program we make up different interview for those students who have had formal training in philosophy and for those have not. Furthermore, the applicant in any category has the option to take the interview in English or Turkish. The interview designed for applicants without any formal background in philosophy does not contain questions on highly specific philosophical issues requiring a lot of knowledge of philosophy. On the other hand, the interview given to applicants who have majored in philosophy previously will be a little more demanding in terms of "philosophical knowledge"; nevertheless, they will be asked questions of a general nature, about issues which any philosophy graduate should know about.  Through the interview, the interview committee will try to sense if the applicant has any real interest in and serious intent to study philosophy, and of course, has the ability to finish the degree.  If you satisfy these basic requirements, you really don’t need to worry about getting admitted to the program. There is no scheme of preparation, no reading list or any "key to success" for the interview that the department recommends to applicants. We want you to come as you are...

Since English is the medium of instruction at the Middle East Technical University, applicants to any graduate program of the university are required to pass the English Proficiency Exam administered by the university. Applicants with adequate TOEFL or similar test scores don't have to take the English Proficiency Exam, and applicants who carry the passport of an English-speaking country are exempt from any such proof of proficiency in English.

In order to be admitted to any graduate program in a university in Turkey, students have to take the ALES. ALES is administered by a government organization twice a year. It is similar in nature to the GRE Aptitude Test, and it is in Turkish. Non-Turkish citizens are normally expected to take the GRE in place of ALES.


Required Documents for Application

Detailed information about required Documents which will be uploaded to the online application system:

 Application Fee Receipt

 English Proficiency Exams

 Graduate Exams

 Reference Letters

 Transcript

 Letter of Intention

 

Application Criteria

 

Degrees

 

Graduate Exams

 

English Proficiency Exams

 

Letter of

 

Intention

 

Reference Letters

 

cGPA

ALES

GRE

ODTÜ-İYS

TOEFL-IBT

IELTS

MA

(with Thesis)

EA 65

Quantitative

 685

 

69.5

 86

7.0

English

or

Turkish

 

2*

-

PhD

EA 70

Quantitative 708

 

75

 92

7.0

English

or

Turkish

 

2*

-

*Except from METU Philosophy graduates should submit.

All applicants are invited for an interview without a pre-evaluation.

Ph.D. Program in Philosopy

Compulsory Courses

PHIL 600 Ph.D. Seminar (3-0)3
PHIL 655 Research Problems in Philosophy of Science (3-0)3
PHIL 604 Prothesis Seminar NC
PHIL 699 Ph.D. Dissertion NC
PHIL 900-999 Special Topics NC

 

Elective Courses

PHIL 601 Special Issues in Epistemology I (3-0)3
PHIL 602 Special Issues in Epistemology II (3-0)3
PHIL 603 Special Issues in Philosophical Logic I (3-0)3
PHIL 610 Issues in the History of Turkish-Islamic Philosophy (3-0)3
PHIL 611 Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Knowledge and Value  (3-0)3
PHIL 612 Ethics and Political Philosophy in the Enlightenment (3-0)3
PHIL 621 Ontology and Philosophy of Mind I (3-0)3
PHIL 622 Ontology and Philosophy of Mind II (3-0)3
PHIL 623 Discourse Analysis of Philosophical Text I (3-0)3
PHIL 624 Discourse Analysis of Philosophical Text II (3-0)3
PHIL 627 Special Issues in Ontology I (3-0)3
PHIL 628 Special Issues in Ontology II (3-0)3
PHIL 630 Special Topics in History of Science (3-0)3
PHIL 631 Axiomatization of Scientific Theories (3-0)3
PHIL 632 Dynamics of Scientific Theories (3-0)3
PHIL 633 Foundations of Logic I (3-0)3
PHIL 634 Foundations of Logic II (3-0)3
PHIL 635 Studies in Ethics (3-0)3
PHIL 636 Studies in Political Philosophy (3-0)3
PHIL 637 Studies in the Philosophy of Wittgenstein I (3-0)3
PHIL 638 Studies in the Philosophy of Wittgenstein II (3-0)3
PHIL 640 Logical Foundations of Statistical Inference (3-0)3
PHIL 643 Basic Issues in Philosophy (3-0)3
PHIL 644 Current Problems in Philosophy (3-0)3
PHIL 647 Studies in the History of Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 648 Studies in the History of Philosophy II (3-0)3
PHIL 650 Great Philosophers (3-0)3
PHIL 651 Studies in Metaphilosophy (3-0)3
PHIL 652 Historiography and Metahistory of Science (3-0)3
PHIL 653 Theories of Scientific Method (3-0)3
PHIL 654 Philosophy of Nature (3-0)3
PHIL 711 Special Assignments in Philosophy I (3-0)3
PHIL 712 Special Assignments in Philosophy II (3-0)3

 

Description of Courses in Ph.D. Program

PHIL 600 Ph. D. Seminar
PHIL 601 Special Issues in Epistemology I:
Study of the main issues connected with truth, belief, knowledge, skepticism, justification, reliability, coherence.
PHIL 602 Special Issues in Epistemology II:
A continuation of PHIL 601.
PHIL 603 Special Issues in Philosophical Logic I:
Application of Modal and Intentional Logics and the possible world semantics to the main issues of philosophy.
 PHIL 604 Prothesis Seminar:
A seminar to be given by each Ph. D. degree candidate related to his/her dissertation topic.
PHIL 610 Issues in the History of Turkish-Islamic Philosophy:
Special topics in Turkish and Islamic philosophy, and solutions offered by immanent philosophers.
PHIL 611 Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Knowledge and Value:
PHIL 612 Ethics and Political Philosophy in thr Enlightenment:
PHIL 621 Ontology and Philosophy of Mind I:
Logical analysis of ontological problems and main issues in the philosophy of mind.
PHIL 622 Ontology and Philosophy of Mind II:
A continuation of PHIL 621.
PHIL 623 Discourse Analysis of Philosophical Texts I:
Logical analysis of discourse, speech, acts, illocutionary logic, analysis of philosophical texts.
PHIL 624 Discourse Analysis of Philosophical Texts II:
A continuation of PHIL 623.
PHIL 627 Special Issues in Ontology I:
Ontological aspects of modal logic and possible world semantics.
PHIL 628 Special Issues in Ontology II:
A continuation of PHIL 627.
PHIL 630 Special Topics in History of Science:
Discussion of a particular topic or the works of a particular scientist in the history of science.
PHIL 631 Axiomatization of Scientific Theories:
Axiomatization of and logical reconstruction of the structure of physical theories.
PHIL 632 Dynamics of Scientific Theories:
Logical analysis of the evolution of physical theories.
PHIL 633 Foundations of Logic I:
Studies in the foundations of logical theories.
PHIL 634 Foundations of Logic II:
A continuation of PHIL 633. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
PHIL 635 Studies in Ethics:
In depth study of ethical concepts and theories.
PHIL 636 Studies in Political Philosophy:
Study of major problems in political philosophy.
PHIL 637 Studies in the Philosophy of Wittgenstein I:
Studies in Wittgenstein's later philosophy.
PHIL 638 Studies in the Philosophy of Wittgenstein II:
A continuation of PHIL 637.
PHIL 640 Logical Foundations of Statistical Inference:
The logical interpretation, the frequency interpretation and the subjective interpretation of probability calculus. Inductive logic and logical structure of statistical inference: a) The Bayesian approach and the logic of decision, b) The likelihood approach and the logic of support.
PHIL 643 Basic Issues in Philosophy:
Intensive discussion of the basic epistemological and ontological doctrines which have influenced the development of contemporary philosophy.
PHIL 644 Current Problems in Philosophy:
A continuation of PHIL 643.
PHIL 647 Studies in the History of Philosophy I:
Guided reading of basic texts, chosen from various ages of philosophical inquiry, primarily connected with each student's proposed area of specialization.
PHIL 648 Studies in the History of Philosophy II:
A continuation of PHIL 647.
PHIL 650 Great Philosophers:
In-depth study of the major work of a great philosopher.
PHIL 651 Studies in Metaphilosophy:
Investigation of the main problems concerning the end, subject matter and methods of philosophy.
PHIL 652 Historiography and Metahistory of Science:
Examination of the philosophies, methods and sources in the history of science, and their relations to the current state of scholar-ship.
PHIL 653 Theories of Scientific Method:
Views on the methods of mathematical and empirical sciences in the ancient wolrd; theories of scientific method since Renaissance.
PHIL 654 Philosophy of Nature:
Greek cosmology; the Renaissance view of nature; the modern view of nature.
PHIL 655 Research Problems in Philosophy of Science:
Identifying and examining the main problems at the frontier of philosophy of science.
Phil 711 Special Assignments in Philosophy I:
This course is designed as a remedial course for students who are divided to pass departmental Ph.D. Qualifying Examination under the condition that they complete two or more papers or other assignments on topics to be determined by the Qualifying Examination Committee. There will normally be no lectures or examinations in this course.
Phil 712 Special Assignments in Philosophy II:
This course is designed as a remedial course for students who are divided to pass departmental Ph.D. Qualifying Examination under the condition that they complete two or more papers or other assignments on topics to be determined by the Qualifying Examination Committee. There will normally be no lectures or examinations in this course.
PHIL 699 Ph. D. Dissertation:
PHIL 900-999 Special Topics: